Dr Scott Jameison and your eyes.

USR member Scott Jamieson, in his best of humor, took the assemblage on a rapid-fire visit to eye diseases. Several of his points:

  • Good vision is the main cause of blindness, in that, by the time something sinister (or dextral) is found, it may be too late.
  • Other risk factors are smoking, aging, sedentary lifestyle, and nutritional matters.
  • The optic nerve is actually part of the brain, and as such, is largely unforgiving in injury or illness.
  • Antioxidants are deemed beneficial in reducing risk of eye disease.
  • The macula, occupying a small part of the retina, is responsible for 95% of vision. Ergo, Macular Degeneration (MD) is a serious threat.
    • The “dry” type of MD, typified by the stippling presence of drusen, cannot be treated.
    • Dry MD can lead to the exudative or “wet” form, with its proliferation of abnormal blood vessels and spillage of red cells.
    • An injection treatment for wet MD may slow the process, but is no cure. Untreated wet MD leads to blindness.
  • Diabetic retinopathy is the second leading cause of blindness.
  • Bleeding into the vitreous can result in clots to impair vision, as can retinal detachment.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa is untreatable.
  • Glaucoma is often an insidious condition in that there is often no pain.
    • In glaucoma, blood flow is compromised, starving the anterior part of the eye of oxygen.
    • It is important to realize that glaucoma can be managed but never cured. The pressure must be kept down.
    • African Americans are quite susceptible to glaucoma. Per Scott: 50% have the condition and do not know it.
  • Cataract surgery now entails the choice of the lenses to be implanted.

In conclusion: “Those who are wise take care of their eyes.”

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University Sunrise Rotary Supports Teen Feed!

At our August 10th breakfast meeting, Past President Jim Horrigan presented a check for $10,000 to Janine Kennedy, Teen Feed’s Director of Community Outreach. Janine told us that the money will fund Teen Feed’s Street Talk Outreach (STOP) program.

Each year, University Sunrise selects a beneficiary for the proceeds of our primary fund-raising event, Debuts and Discoveries (see fun photos here:  D&D Photos).

We selected Teen Feed because of its outstanding work with homeless and at-risk youth in our community. Teen Deed’s STOP program is aimed at high-risk youth who avoid traditional social service agencies. Armed with backpacks, warm water, granola and soups, STOP sends out teams of staff and peer outreach workers to meet youth in their own environment—the streets and alleys where they spend most of their time.  In 2015, STOP made over 3,614 positive contacts with youth on the streets, offering socks, food, referrals to resources, and a relationship with a caring adult (more info. here: Teen Feed Programs).

We congratulate Teen feed on this award and we thank them for their continuing work with homeless youth!

 

[Have a passion for community service? Want to work with a fun positive group of do-ers in our community? Visit our web page: USRotary.org or our Facebook page: USRotary Facebook or stop by for breakfast, get to meet us and hear more at 7:15 on a Thursday morning at Ivar’s Salmon House on Northlake in Seattle.]     

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Christy Goff: How to deal with Stress

Katie Leis with Christy Goff

On August 10th, Christy Goff, faced with speaking on such a vast subject as Stress, gave an encapsulated overview supplemented by an exhaustive handout.

Stress is anything that inhibits the balance among physical, emotional, and mental power. It can be external or internal. Physiologically, stress upsets the equilibrium among serotonin, a brain hormone concerned with feeling good; cortisol, an adrenal hormone and glucose, both concerned with the Flight or Fight reaction. This disruption can result in symptoms such as poor cognition, fatigue, depression, and exhaustion. In extreme cases, to wit, burnout, the stress factor(s) must be aborted, lest permanent damage ensue. At times, we need a little bit of stress to keep us going at optimal function.

The speaker posits that stress is treatable, entailing channels in the forms of physical activity, nutrition, and relaxation/sleep. She gave a rundown of the intrinsic benefits of each, and how to go about utilizing them. It is certain that she touched upon experiences of everyone in the audience.

For certainly, stress and coping mechanisms have been with us from early evolutionary times. It has been the property of all of us.

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Relay for Life: August 11

Katie Leis, Community Development Manager, of the American Cancer Society discussed Relay for Life, annual event to benefit the American Cancer Society.

It will occur on 8/12 at Cal Anderson Park, with the purpose of raising money to fight cancer. She averred that cancer never sleeps. She provided information as to how to register on line and gave information as to the events. Also, there will be a Bark for Life in which dogs will participate. The opening ceremony at 10AM will recognize the survivors of the disease. A ceremony called Luminaria is one in which those who have succumbed will be remembered. The closing ceremony’s aim is to educate the participants and all others, with the motto, Fight Back.

In addition, President Dave presented Katie with the club’s $500 check toward the cause.

Click to Register or Donate!
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