NOVEMBER COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: Clothing Drive

Fall is definitely here!  November’s service project is a clothing drive.  Please bring slightly used sweaters, jackets, or any other warm article of clothing to our meeting at Ivar’s Salmon House, Thursdays @ 7:15 AM.  Items will be donated to the homeless in our area. Any questions contact Colleen White, communityservice@usrotary.org.

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Debuts and Discoveries 2018: Sponsors Needed

While the major University Sunrise Rotary fundraiser is 6 months away (March 17, 2018), we need event sponsors NOW!

Of course, the big reason for soliciting sponsors is to reduce or eliminate the amount needed from our net proceeds to pay our event organizing costs such as rent, permits, beverage curator, printing, PR and more.  The more sponsor dollars we have coming in, the more we are able deliver to our supported charity, Friends of the Children.

In past years, many of you have stepped up to sponsor personally or on behalf of an employer.  We truly appreciate such great support and are hoping that this will be repeated this year.  If neither you or your employer can contribute, perhaps you have a business that you frequent that might be interested in helping.

To help gathering sponsors contact Nancy Bolin: tasting[at]usrotary.org

Sponsorship and the benefits of sponsorship plus details on Friends of the Children are linked.

Sponsor Solicitation Letter.doc

D & D Sponsor Benefits_2018.doc

Beneficiary: The Friends of the Children

Thanks for your wonderful support!

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American Cancer Society

Last week’s presentation came in three parts:

Paul Kilian spoke of the Cancer Resource Centers, of which 10 exist in WA. His, the Valley Resource Center, sees some 1,000 patients par year. Volunteers visit every patient on infusion. They provide support, wigs, gifts, and information binders to the patients. Advocates are full-time employees and work in behalf of this work, to the extent of lobbying in the legislature. The Committee on Cancer, a branch of the American College of Surgeons, is a consortium of professors concerned with screening and other matters. These organizations are devoted to improving social situations and quality of life for cancer patients. A 24/7 telephone network is there to answer all questions and concerns.

Audrey Fine, RN, dwelt mainly on prevention, but touched on gene therapy. This method stimulates the immune system to attack cancer cells. Positing that cancer touches all our lives, she quoted the head of the Resource Centers, to wit, 50% of cancer could be prevented if we implement what we already know. She also noted that the Research Department boasts 47 Nobel Prize winners.  Prevention includes smoking avoidance, early detection, HPV vaccine, and the realization that tanning and obesity are risk factors. Access to health care is a must. The cost of cigarettes has become a factor in discouragement of the habit. Patients are seen at the resource centers regardless of ability to pay. More are needed to be screened. Certain barriers in getting patients to be seen are language, poor education, time off from work, infancy, old age. The centers have interpreters.

Kimberly Arent dealt with the matter of funding for this work, namely Relay for Life: August 12th , from 10AM to 6PM this annual event will take place. Participation is urged for as many as possible. Signups are with Alan. Our contact for this program.

 

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University of Washington “Tent City”

In the February 16th production, University of Washington “Tent City”, the cast was comprised of Toni Sarge, thesis student; Ted Hunter, pro bono lawyer; and dedicated volunteers Jason Tavares, Scott Morrow, and Courtney O’Toole.

As homeless shelters go, this one complies with laws, screens its residents, embraces cleanliness, and disallows drunkenness and drug activity. Hospitality is extended to visitors, from whom contributions of food and clothing are welcomed. TC is one of a network of 11 similar self-help locations. These are necessary establishments, lest people lack the basics of life.

Only 2500 shelter beds exist. Efforts are made to keep couples together. The number of affordable family housing units remains limited. People come and go. For extreme weather, warm shelters are available. TCs are self-managed, with officers elected, an executive committee is in force. A security test must be passed for entry. There is a strict code of conduct. Two security people are present around the clock.
There is a large community tent for socialization, as well as a kitchen. Weekly camp meetings are held. Bus tickets are provided for those who must get to jobs.  In addition, the UW provides monthly dental care. A foot clinic, acupuncture, and alternate medicine options are available. Nursing care is also provided.

In short, not all homeless individuals are alike; a variety of factors has brought them to the shelters. The chief single factor that has made TCs necessary is the shortage of affordable housing. Until supply can meet demand, people must be sustained in this way, and by the selflessness of those who shepherd them

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Relay for Life 2017

Relay for Life

This is an opportunity to gather with people in the community in order to raise funds and awareness. Globally, it is the largest fundraising event.  It is a way of celebrating the survivors and to remember those lost. It will take place at Cal Anderson Park on Saturday, 8/12, from 10AM to 6PM. The various competitions and awards have been described. Entertainment and speakers are scheduled. Last year, there were 21 teams, 119 participants, and $34,657.63 raised. This year there will be a Bark-for-Life event, honoring the canine caregivers.  Survivors will receive a shirt and a medal.

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American Cancer Society

On February 9th. David Leon of the American Cancer Society and Kara Fortney, Senior Manager of Relay for Life held the floor.

As to the disease, statistics show that it cannot be ignored. It was cited that one in three females and one in two males will face it in some form in their lifetimes. The ACS, in its mission to lead the fight for a world without cancer, espouses these principles:

  • To increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% by 2018.
  • To reduce lung cancer age-adjusted mortality by 50% in a decade.
  • Ensure that nobody dies due to non-access to care.
  • Eliminating HPV-related cancers
  • Equalizing outcomes for all facing breast cancer.
  • Ensure that all cancer survivors can access care.
  • Enable communities to fight cancer by addressing the true determinant of health.

They averred that the above, plus the cost of research, is expensive. Donations are vital in this work. The dollars are put to work in Washington via.

  • Care and empathy, to wit, information lines, rides to and from treatment, navigation of patients through the healthcare system, management of treatment side effects, free or reduced cost lodging.
  • Courage, to wit, funding to reduce the unequal burden of cancer, visits to cancer.org, grants to help low-income patients to receive screening.
  • Determination, to wit, rallying communities and creating partnerships to help save lives.
  • Innovation, to wit finding cancer’s causes and cures.

Relay for Life

This is an opportunity to gather with people in the community in order to raise funds and awareness. Globally, it is the largest fundraising event.  It is a way of celebrating the survivors and to remember those lost. It will take place at Cal Anderson Park on Saturday, 8/12, from 10AM to 6PM. The various competitions and awards have been described. Entertainment and speakers are scheduled. Last year, there were 21 teams, 119 participants, and $34,657.63 raised. This year there will be a Bark-for-Life event, honoring the canine caregivers.  Survivors will receive a shirt and a medal.

 

 

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November Food Drive to benefit the UNIVERSITY DISTRICT FOOD BANK

Teresa St. OngeUNIVERSITY SUNRISE ROTARY – In-House “COLOR TEAM COMPETITION” Food Drive to benefit the UNIVERSITY DISTRICT FOOD BANK… 

UDFB has entered its busiest season and is distributing groceries to over 1,100 families, delivering food to 105 homebound adults, and providing weekend food to 500-plus middle, elementary and high school students through their Pack for Kids program.  They currently serve 11 schools! 

WHEN:      First three Thursdays in November
November 3rd, 10th and 17th 

WHAT DO YOU DO?  Donate items or Cash.  As a member of your team, by your giving, your team will add 10 points to their cumulative total-to-date.

We’ll announce at each Thursday’s meeting the team scores- it’s a win-win!

It’s also easy and fun!  PLEASE CONSIDER GIVING to an agency our Club is so proud to be a partner with…………

 Needed items:  In addition to the ‘always need’ canned good items that include fruit (highly desired!), canned chicken, canned tuna, canned salmon, canned soups, stews and chili’s, peanut and other nut butters (especially Crunchy), shelf stable milk and milk alternatives, cereal and cooking oil are most appreciated!

They would also really like to have hygiene items – soaps, toilet paper, lotions, toothpaste, feminine hygiene products and BABY PRODUCTS – formula and diapers, especially large size diapers for older babies.  

Make your check out to University District Food Bank if you desire to contribute funding.

Bring your items in each Thursday – we’ll make sure they get delivered.

Thank you for all you do!!!  UDFB appreciates Rotaries continuous support and love.

 

Teri St. Onge and your Community Service Club Committee Members

 

 

 

 

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Ed Bronsdon: Outdoors 4 All

Ed BronsonWhenever we receive a talk from Ed Bronsdon, all become reminded of the hope, accomplishments, and joie de vivre imparted by Outdoors for All. Those who would sink into depression and despair are simply not permitted to, once within the purview of this organization. OFA has several facets. This time, it was that of cycling which, if not precisely termed an art form, it is unquestionably a science. Moreover, it takes those who would be out of the mainstream and includes them in the fun and camaraderie.

The cycling program originated from downhill skiing, the nucleus of all that has evolved to date. Anecdotal vignettes included a skier who had lost the use of his legs; children with muscular dystrophy; a blind snowmobiler; a biker with a brain tumor, and several others. Veterans are particularly vulnerable, with PTSD plus or minus physical impairments. They are enabled to relate to the group, socialize, and connect with others. One of the transcendent events is the Seattle-to-Portland bike occurrence. Everyone gets there, no matter by what type of conveyance nor how long it takes. Recumbent trikes are now part of more than 120 in the fleet.

There are 700 volunteers and 18 full time staff. Activities, in addition to skiing and cycling, include kayaking and rock climbing. To date, 2438 have benefited. While much of the activity is in the Puget Sound area, the show often goes on the road to include others.

Observation: We get the impression that Ed and his retinue have not exhausted all the activities to be scheduled nor the apparatuses with which to do them. It will be no surprise to hear of them. Their motto that everyone counts and is important would do well to be part of global weltanschauung.

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Support Teen Feed clothing drive

University Sunrise Rotary is proud to support Teen Feed! Teen-Feed-Logo
Teen Feed’s programs operate on the principle that when youth are able to rely on consistent contact with safe and non-judgmental adults, they are better able to take on the challenges of finding safe shelter, a job, or attending to their mental or physical health.  Teen Feed is a confidential program which respects the needs for safety and privacy of the young people we serve.  We provide meal site schedules to youth in program, during outreach, and at the Teen Feed office.

 

What: Teen Feed clothing/item drive 

When: February 4th, 7:00 AM to Noon

Where:   Ivar’s Salmon House 401 NE Northlake Way Seattle, WA 98105

We Need:

  • Full-size toothpaste and deodorants are always useful.
  • WOOL socks (still stay warm when wet). Size XL
  • Carhart-style work pants, and work boots men’s size10, 11, 12. 
  • Kids are currently requesting mini flashlights, headlamps, and batteries for the headlamps. The kids camp outside.  
  • Warm clothes
  • Sleeping bags, tents, and blankets

Join us for breakfast Thursday morning and donate to Teen Feed.

 

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